Friday, June 29, 2012

Get a new 11.6" Acer Aspire ONE 722-0022 Netbook for only $364!

This offer expired on 7/6/12. Please see top banner ad for current deal.


11.6" Acer Aspire One 722-0022The 11.6" Aspire One 722 is sensationally designed to deliver amazing HD visual experiences wherever you go. Anytime, anywhere connectivity plus an eco-friendly platform round out this netbook and make it ideal for your highly mobile digital lifestyle.

Until July 6th, 2012, you can order a new 11.6” Acer Aspire ONE 722-0022 from Hyphenet for only $364, plus shipping!

Specifications for 11.6” Acer Aspire ONE 722-0022





















































Display11.6" LED backlight
CineCrystal 1366 x 768 (HD)
ProcessorAMD C-60 1.33 GHz / 1 MB Cache
Storage500 GB HDD (5400 RPM)
RAM4 GB DDR3
GraphicsAMD Radeon HD 6250
Networking802.11n,
10/100 Ethernet
CameraIntegrated webcam
SoundStereo speakers,
microphone
Connection / Expansion3 x USB 2.0
HDMI
VGA
LAN
Headphone output
Microphone input
Memory card reader
Operating SystemWindows 7 Home Premium 64-bit
Battery6-cell lithium-ion
4400 mAh
Up to 7 hours
Warranty1 Year Acer Limited Warranty

Don't miss out on this Buy of the Week! Call (619) 325-0990 to order your 11.6” Acer Aspire ONE 722-0022 today!


Buy of the Week offer valid through July 6th, 2012.

Note: Shipping and taxes apply.

Looking for something else? Check out our monthly deals or contact us to get a quote on the product you're searching for.

This offer expired on 7/6/12. Please see top banner ad for current deal.

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

More "Bad Photo" Spam Hitting Inboxes, Inviting Users to Download Malware

Surprised Gasp MemeHead's up, everyone! There’s another round of “bad photo” spam hitting inboxes.

This time the emails attempt to piquĂ© your curiosity by either warning that a “police investigation is under way now” or that a set of revealing photos of your girlfriend have been leaked online.

Both emails encourage you to download an attached zip file named “Photo.zip.”

"Enjoy the Consequences" Spam



From: Kenny Kaps (KennyKapspery@gmail.com)
Subject: You can’t say I haven’t warned you, now enjoy the consequences.

Hello racer1164,

I got to admint your GF has a nice butt:) I just don't know how these photos leaked online. I don't think your GF in in adult business, isn't she?? anyway I received this picture from three of mine FB buddies today. It's in attachment

Police Investigation Underway Spam



From: Chastity Rodeigues
Subject: The police investigation is under way now. You’ll be really sorry about what you’ve done.

Hate to bother you brianhaugen26,
Why did you have to put these photos online? All the hell is gonna break loose now, don't you understant? Take them down immediately! Don't tell me you don't know what photos I'm talking about! Check attachment!

If you guessed that these file archives contained malware, you’re right. A VirusTotal scan of the file attachments found that they both harbored malware that Microsoft detects as Win32/Gamarue.I.

Microsoft’s analysis of Gamarue.I states that upon infection, the malware makes registry edits, connects to a remote server to download additional arbitrary files and copies itself to removable drives when the opportunity presents itself.

That being said, if you receive any email messages similar to the ones shown above (or ones we’ve previously written about), it is recommended that you:

  • Refrain from downloading or opening any attached files.

  • Delete the email immediately.


Don’t miss out on the latest tech news and computer security alerts! Follow us on Twitter at @hyphenet,  “Like” us on Facebook or add us to your circle on Google+.

Monday, June 25, 2012

StalkTrak App Phishing Scam Steals Twitter Login Information

Twitter iconAre you dying to know who’s checking out your Twitter timeline?

Contrary to what the fake Twitter authorization page may say, the “StalkTrak” app does not show you a list of your Twitter “stalkers.”

No, instead it will steal your Twitter login, send that off to the soon-to-be new owners of your Twitter account and show you a bogus list of those that allegedly lurk on your Twitter profile to distract you in the meantime.

How the StalkTrak App Phishing Scam Works



  1. Your personal invitation to be scammed comes in the form of a DM reading something like this:
    Check this app out [SHORT LINK] it displays anyone that has viewed you on Twitter!
    Check this app out [SHORT LINK] it displays anyone that has viewed you on Twitter!

  2. StalkTrak App Phishing Scam PageOnce you click on the link, you will be taken to a spoofed Twitter app authorization page that hopes your desire to find out who’s checking you out on Twitter is enough to get you to enter your Twitter account login credentials.

    (Note the funky domain name that almost looks like it’s meant to mimic the Twitter.com domain, but not quite.)

  3. Bogus Results from StalkTrak "App"Your login information is sent off to the cybercrooks and you’re redirected to a fake page displaying a list of Twitter users divided into 3-columns named “Mutual”, “Stalking” & “Stalkers.”

    (Btw, I know this isn’t an actual working app because I entered fake Twitter login credentials on the authorization page and yet I was still taken to the “results” page. I’d imagine it would be difficult to give me a list of my stalkers if you don’t have my real Twitter name, yes?)


Now that we’ve blown the cover on this phishing scheme (which has been around for months, apparently), what shall we do about it?

What to Do if You Get a Phishing DM on Twitter


If you’re ever sent a DM that claims that you can find out who’s stalking you or that there’s someone spreading rumors about you, it is recommended that you:

Have you received any messages on Twitter urging you to check out the StalkTrak app? So far we’ve received two, but they were from the same user.

Don’t miss out on the latest tech news and computer security alerts! Follow us on Twitter at @hyphenet,  “Like” us on Facebook or add us to your circle on Google+.

Friday, June 22, 2012

Buy a 15.4-inch MacBook Pro (MD318LL/A) for $1,560!

This offer expired on 6/29/12. Please check the top banner ad for our current deal.

This version of the 15.4-inch MacBook Pro (model MD318LL/A) features a second-generation 2.2 GHz Core i7 quad-core processor, 500 GB hard drive, and 4 GB of installed RAM.

Other features include ultra-fast Wireless-N Wi-Fi networking, Bluetooth connectivity, an SDXC card slot, two USB 2.0 ports, and a FireWire 800 port.

Until June 29th, 2012, you can order a new 15.4-inch MacBook Pro from Hyphenet for only $1,560, plus shipping!

Specifications for 15.4-inch MacBook Pro

























































Display15.4" LED backlight
1440 x 900 (WXGA+)
Glossy, edge-to-edge glass.
ProcessorIntel Core i7 2.2 GHz / 6 MB Cache
Storage500 GB HDD (5400 RPM)
RAM4 GB DDR3
Optical DriveDVD±RW (±R DL) - fixed
GraphicsAMD Radeon HD 6750M
/ Intel HD Graphics 3000 - 512 MB GDDR5
Networking802.11n,
Bluetooth 2.1 EDR,
Gigabit Ethernet
CameraIntegrated webcam
(1280 x 720 Res)
SoundStereo speakers,
subwoofer,
microphone
Connection / ExpansionLAN
FireWire 800
2 x USB 2.0
Thunderbolt
Microphone input
Headphone/SPDIF combo jack
Operating SystemOS X 10.7 Lion
BatteryLithium polymer
77.5 Wh
Up to 7 hours
Warranty1 Year Apple Limited Warranty
90 days of Technical Phone Support (Apple)

Don't miss out on this Buy of the Week! Call (619) 325-0990 to order your 15.4-inch MacBook Pro today!


Buy of the Week offer valid through June 29th, 2012.

Note: Shipping and taxes apply.

We also carry the BRAND NEW Macbook Pro with Retina display, contact us for pricing!

Looking for something else? Check out our monthly deals or contact us to get a quote on the product you're searching for.
This offer expired on 6/29/12. Please check the top banner ad for our current deal.

Trojan.Milicenso Annoying Users by Displaying Ads, Sending Printers into Printing Frenzy

Not the work of a poltergeist.If your printer ever starts burning through reams of paper and wasting ink/toner by printing random gibberish, don’t worry – it’s not the work of a poltergeist.

It could be an indication of a malware infection, though.

Trojan.Milicenso is a “malware delivery vehicle for hire” that Symantec researchers have been keeping tabs on since it was first spotted in 2010.

The malware’s most recent endeavors involve infecting machines in the U.S., India, northern Europe and South America to annoy users with advertisements & send printers into a paper-wasting frenzy. (The latter is said to be a “side effect” rather than an intentional goal.)

There are many ways Trojan.Milicenso can make its way onto your PC, including via malicious email attachments, drive-by-download websites (often linked to in spam emails), or masquerading as fake video codecs.

After successfully gaining entry into a target machine, the malware will edit registry files so it runs on Windows startup, ensuring that it can jump on every opportunity to redirect the user’s browser in order to display advertisements.

The printing madness stems from the malware creating .spl file (an executable file detected as Adware.Eorezo in hiding) within the Window’s default print spooler directory ([DRIVE_LETTER]\system32\Spool\PRINTERS\[RANDOM].spl.), which – depending on the system configuration – triggers print jobs that don’t stop until the printer runs out of paper or the plug is pulled.

Symantec detects the file associated with this threat as Trojan.Milicenso, Adware.Eorezo, Packed.Generic.371 and Packed.Generic.372.

To prevent your PC from becoming infected (and save trees), it’s recommended that you:

  • Keep your operating system & installed software patched and up-to-date.

  • Run antivirus software and keep the virus definitions current.

  • Be careful not to download files attached to emails from untrusted sources OR click links within suspicious emails.


Photo Credit: leokoivulehto

Don’t miss out on the latest tech news and computer security alerts! Follow us on Twitter at @hyphenet,  “Like” us on Facebook or add us to your circle on Google+

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

'Android Security Suite Premium' App is Malware in Disguise

Android Security Suite Premium Icon

If you’re an Android user, there’s a good chance that you’ve caught a headline or two warning about the latest piece of malware targeting the mobile OS, and are now considering downloading a security app to add another layer of protection to your device.

Should this be the case, just make sure that you don’t inadvertently download malware masquerading as a mobile security application in the process.

Researchers at both Kaspersky Lab and Webroot recently found that a security app named “Android Security Suite Premium” was anything but what the name implied, as it adhered to the demands of its villainous command & control (C&C) server.

Such commands usually entailed stealing incoming SMS messages – possibly along with other system information – and relaying that information back to the attackers.

In analyzing six samples of the bogus security app, Kaspersky Lab discovered 6 different C&C domains encoded within them, one of which had been registered with the same fake data as ZeuS C&C domains.

It is for this reason that the “Android Security Suite Premium” app has earned title as the latest variant of ZitMo (short for ‘Zeus in the Mobile’) trojans.

Kaspersky Lab did not disclose where they had retrieved their APK samples; however, researchers over at Webroot found the Android Security Suite Premium app lurking in torrents and/or third-party Android markets.

So, if you’re on the hunt for a legitimate mobile security app, it is suggested that you:

  • Download the app from the official Google Play store.

  • Check the developer name, number of downloads and most important of all, user reviews.


It is worth noting that majority of PC antivirus vendors also offer a mobile security solution, so it may be best to do a little research before searching the Google Play store so you can verify the company's Google Play developer name, app permissions and the like.

Screenshot Credit: Kaspersky Lab

Don’t miss out on the latest tech news and computer security alerts! Follow us on Twitter at @hyphenet,  “Like” us on Facebook or add us to your circle on Google+

Update iTunes to Patch Security Hole That Could Allow Remote Code Execution

iTunes logoIf you use iTunes, you may want to stop and check to make sure you have the most recent version (10.6.3) installed on your machine.

Last week, Apple released version 10.6.3, which addressed a security flaw that would allow remote code execution if you made the mistake of opening a malicious playlist (.m3u).

Per Apple’s release notes:
Description: A heap buffer overflow existed in the handling of .m3u playlists.

Impact: Importing a maliciously crafted .m3u playlist may lead to an unexpected application termination or arbitrary code execution.

Don’t leave your system at risk, update iTunes now.

Don’t miss out on the latest tech news and computer security alerts! Follow us on Twitter at @hyphenet,  “Like” us on Facebook or add us to your circle on Google+

Monday, June 18, 2012

Fake Windows Live Notices Direct You to Canadian Pharmacy Sites

Windows Live Messenger IconWould spammers send you a fake Windows Live friend request just to earn clicks to their pharmaceutical website?

Judging by the warning that was recently posted by Jeff Jones on the Microsoft Security Blog, it appears that they most definitely would.

Here’s a copy of the email that’s currently hitting inboxes:
From: Windows Live (notification-microsoft.com)
Subject: Microsoft notification

Kaylen Giles wants to be your friend on Windows Live [VIEW INVITATION]

Notifications preferences | SMS notifications | Microsoft privacy statement

It may be surprising to know that only one link in the email, “[VIEW INVITATION]”, is booby-trapped. All other links go to their legitimate destinations, which help build the email’s credibility.

Should you make the mistake of clicking on the invitation, you will be redirected to a Canadian pharmacy website, canadapillgroup.com. But how can you avoid making that mistake in the first place?

By closely examining the email, of course!

Tips to Help You Spot a Fake Windows Live Notification



  • One of the first things you’ll notice about the email is the odd sender address, which is merely a domain name (“notification-microsoft.com”). As Jeff Jones explained, “the SMTP protocol doesn’t do any validation of this field for email, so Spammers (and anyone) can put anything there they want.” So if you receive a Windows Live notification from an invalid sender’s address similar to this one, it’s likely a fake.

  • Mouseover ALL of the links within the email, not just one or two as  spammers sometimes slip in a few legitimate links to make the email appear authentic. If the links point to a domain that doesn’t match the service or company they’re allegedly associated with (ex: profile.live.com, www.microsoft.com, etc.), then there’s a good possibility that it’s fake.

  • The friend request is coming from someone who you don’t recognize. Even if this were a real notification, the actual contact could be a spammer or bot looking to share all of their spammy goodness.


What to Do with Windows Live Spam


Did you get your very own copy of this spam? Here’s what I recommend doing:

  1. Do not click on any links or reply to the email.

  2. Mark the message as ‘Spam’ or ‘Junk’ in your email client.

  3. Report the email to SpamCop.

  4. Delete the email immediately.


Don’t miss out on the latest tech news and computer security alerts! Follow us on Twitter at @hyphenet,  “Like” us on Facebook or add us to your circle on Google+

Facebook ‘Adding Game’: Harmless Fun or Calm Before the Spam Storm?

Facebook logoAre people unknowingly setting themselves up to be spammed on Facebook?

Researchers over at Barracuda Labs have noticed some suspicious activity on Facebook involving (what appears to be) bait accounts luring people into play the “adding game" - which simply involves liking the designated game status, leaving a comment and friending anyone that likes your comment.

Here’s an example of a status welcoming folks to play the game:

Adding Game Post
Adding GAME" ♥ ^.^

Step 1 : LIKE! This status or i will DELETE your comment c:
Step 2 : - COMMENT! Anything ;) ;) :P ♥ (:
Step 3 : Whoever LIKES! your comment, Add them

Seems like a fairly harmless thing to do, right?

That is, until you notice that every page (or user) that’s initiating one of these “adding games” has an attractive female in the default picture.

Combine that with the fact that every single status update is simply firing up another round of the Adding Game and you might begin to suspect that these are fake accounts focused on racking up subjects for a future spam/scam campaign.

At least, that’s the conclusion that researchers over at Barracuda Labs have reached and I can't help but to agree.

If you happen to come across the “Adding Game” on Facebook, I recommend taking a pass on playing and stick to only accepting friend requests from people you know. Otherwise you could run the risk of having your News feed inundated with spam, scams and updates from complete strangers.

Don’t miss out on the latest tech news and computer security alerts! Follow us on Twitter at @hyphenet,  “Like” us on Facebook or add us to your circle on Google+

Friday, June 15, 2012

Ignore Requests to "Verify Your Facebook Account" - It's a Scam

Shiny Facebook IconDon’t fall for the scam that’s currently circulating on Facebook claiming that you need to “verify your account” or risk having it terminated.

It’s merely a ploy to trick you into installing a rogue Facebook application that will likely be used to collect personal information and help the scam spread by posting messages to your friends on your behalf.

You may first encounter the scam by receiving an app request/notification or coming across a post on Facebook that directs you to a page touting a message similar to this one:

Facebook Verification App Scam Page



Warning: Announcement from FACEB00K Verification Team. All Profiles must be verified before [date] To Avoid Scams and Scams Under SOPA ACT. The Unverified Accounts Will Be Terminated. Verify Your Accounts By Below Steps.

STEP 1:

Click here to verify

Final Step Click Below:

Complete Verification

Should you decide to follow through with the request, you will be prompted to grant a third-party application access to your Facebook profile.

Of course, tt would be in your best interest to report the app and hit ‘Cancel’ instead.

Did You Already Fall for the “Verify Your Account” Facebook Scam?


If you caught this warning post-app-approval, then I suggest you do the following:

  • Delete any posts related to this application from your profile and News feed.

  • Remove the app by:

    • Clicking the arrow on the top right of your Facebook account

    • Click ‘Account Settings’

    • Selecting ‘Apps’ from the navigation on the left.

    • Click the ‘x’ next to the offending application.

    • Press ‘Remove’




Be sure to give your friends a head’s up on this scam.

[via ESET]

Don’t forget to like the Hyphenet Facebook page to stay informed about other scams and computer security related news. You can also follow us on Twitter, circle us on Google+ and find us on Pinterest.

10.1" Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 (WiFi, 16GB) for $393, plus shipping!

This offer expired on 6/22/12.

10.1" Samsung Galaxy Tab 2Light and portable, the 7" Galaxy Tab 2 is the ideal personal on-the-go device; while the larger Galaxy Tab 2 (10.1") is well-suited for home and family use.

Until June 22nd, 2012, you can order a 10.1” Samsung Galaxy  Tab 2 (WiFi, 16GB) from Hyphenet for only $393, plus shipping!

(7-inch 8GB version also available. Contact for pricing.)

Specifications for 10.1” Samsung Galaxy  Tab 2 (WiFi, 16GB)





























































Display10.1" PLS
1280 x 800
Multi-Touch
Processor1 GHz (Dual-Core)
Storage16 GB
RAM1 GB
Supported Flash Memory CardsmicroSD
Wireless Connectivity802.11b/g/n,
Bluetooth 3.0
Camera3 Megapixel rear + VGA front
LocationA-GPS
FeaturesUSB Host
LocationA-GPS
Dimensions (WxDxH)10.1 in x 0.4 in x 6.9 in
Weight20.5 oz
ColorTitanium Silver
Warranty1 Year Warranty (Samsung)

Don't miss out on this Buy of the Week! Call (619) 325-0990 to order your 10.1” Samsung Galaxy  Tab 2 today!


Buy of the Week offer valid through June 22nd, 2012.

* Shipping and taxes apply.

Looking for something else? Check out our monthly deals or contact us to get a quote on the product you're searching for.
This offer expired on 6/22/12.

Thursday, June 14, 2012

Phony Amazon Order Confirmation Emails Help Spread Malware

AmazonOnce again, cybercriminals are attempting to use the insane popularity of Amazon to trick users into following questionable email links.

Only, the latest variant of Amazon spam doesn’t just direct users to a pharmaceutical website like the bogus cancellation notices did.

No, instead the fake Amazon order confirmation messages will lead you straight to a malicious site that will attempt to install malware on your computer.

The Bait: Bogus Amazon Order Confirmation Email


Characteristics of the spam messages spotted in the wild:Fake Amazon Confirmation Email

  • The sender's name is “Amazon.com.”

  • Subject lines used:  “Your Amazon.com Kindle e-book order confirmation” or “Your Amazon.com order confirmation.”

  • The billing address, price and ordered item appear to be randomly generated.

  • All of the embedded links point to third-party websites (compromised WordPress sites) and NOT Amazon.com.


The Attack: Courtesy of BlackHole Exploit Kit


Should you make the mistake of clicking on a link within a fraudulent Amazon order confirmation email, you will see a blank page reading:
“Amazon.com Order confirmation

Loading your book

Order ID: Loading…

Print Date/Time [timestamp]”

Meanwhile, the Blackhole exploit kit will work silently in the background, attempting to exploit vulnerabilities within the Microsoft Windows Help & Support Center, Adobe Flash Player, Adobe Reader and Adobe Acrobat to drop malware identified as TROJ_CRYPTOR.TH (TrendMicro) & Win32/AutoRun.Spy.Banker.P (NOD32) on your system.

Keeping Your PC Safe


To avoid falling for this attack, it is recommended that you:

  • Keep your computer’s operating system and software fully patched with the latest updates.

  • Always run antivirus software that offers real-time scanning and keep it up-to-date.

  • Avoid clicking links within emails; type the URL of the website you want to visit directly into your browser address bar.


What to do with Amazon Spam


If you received this email or one similar to it:

[via Webroot & GFI Labs]

Email Screenshot Credit: Webroot

Don’t miss out on the latest tech news and computer security alerts! Follow us on Twitter at @hyphenet,  “Like” us on Facebook or add us to your circle on Google+

Fake Twitter Confirmation Emails Link to Malicious Sites Spreading Malware

Did you receive an email asking you to confirm a Twitter account that you didn’t create?

Don’t click any links inside the email.

In their latest attempt to infect computers with malware, cybercrooks have begun spamming out fake Twitter emails asking users to confirm a non-existent Twitter account.

Here is a copy of the phishing email:
From: Twitter ([random-string]@postmaster.twitter.com)
Subject: Confirm your Twitter account, [random name]!

Hi, [random name].

Please confirm your Twitter account by clicking this link:
Please click here.

Once you confirm, you will have full access to Twitter and all future notifications will be sent to this email address.

The Twitter Team

If you received this message in error and did not sign up for a Twitter account, click not my account.

Please do not reply to this message; it was sent from an unmonitored email address. This message is a service email related to your use of Twitter. For general inquiries or to request support with your Twitter account, please visit us a Twitter Support.

As you can see, the bogus emails look nearly identical to the actual notices sent by Twitter upon creating a new account with one small difference: the link’s anchor text.

In legitimate notices, the confirmation link would read:
“http://twitter.com/account/confirm_email /[name]/[random-strong]”

However, the confirmation link in the fake messages read:
 “Please click here.”

Jovi Umawing, Communications & Research Analyst at GFI Labs warns that all of the links within the email lead users to malicious sites housing the infamous Blackhole exploit pack, which will attempt to exploit vulnerabilities within Adobe Reader and Adobe Flash in order to install malware on the target machine.

GFI Labs detects the exploits & malware threats associated with this attack as Exploit.PDF-JS.Gen (v), Trojan.SWF.Generic (v), and  Trojan.Win32.Generic.pak!cobra.

Protect Yourself From this Attack


To avoid falling victim to this scam, it is strongly recommended that you:

  • Mouseover all email links to check the destination URL before clicking on them.

  • Keep your operating system and installed software fully patched and up-to-date.

  • Always run antivirus software and keep the virus definitions current.


If you receive the email, you can report it to Twitter using this form.

Don’t miss out on the latest tech news and computer security alerts! Follow us on Twitter at @hyphenet,  “Like” us on Facebook or add us to your circle on Google+

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Is That Email Really from Facebook? Fake Notification Emails Spotted

Facebook EmailBe sure that you look first before clicking when checking out links embedded in emails purporting to be from Facebook.

Otherwise, Sophos warns that you may find your browser loading a pharmaceutical website, phishing site, or worse – a malicious site looking to download malware on your PC.

To no surprise, the miscreants behind the fraudulent Facebook emails have put in the time to make sure their spam messages have the best chance of fooling users, although there are always ways to tell them apart.

Here’s a fake Facebook notification email:

Fake Facebook EmailImage Credit: Sophos



From: Facebook (update+42pbyob7pjcg@async.kingfast.com)
Subject: You have notifications pending

Facebook
Hi,
Here’s some activity you have missed on Facebook.
4 friend request

[Go to Facebook] [See All Notifications]

This message was sent to [EMAIL]. If you don’t want to receive these emails from Facebook in the future, please click: unsubscribe.
Facebook, Inc. Attention: Department 415 P.O. Box 10005 Palo Alto CA 94303

How to Spot a Fake Facebook Notification Email


The last thing we would ever want to do is give a spammer the satisfaction of knowing that they’ve successfully tricked us by clicking on a link within their email, right?

As it turns out, I happen to have a legitimate Facebook notification email sitting in my inbox, so I can offer some tips on how to tell the real from the fake:

[caption id="attachment_5691" align="alignright" width="240" caption="Real Facebook Notification Email"]Real Facebook Notification Email[/caption]

  • Authentic Facebook notification emails will address you by name in the subject line. Example: “Marquisa, you have notifications pending.” Fake notification emails subject lines read “You have notifications pending” since the spammer does not have your name, only your email address.

  • Inside, real Facebook notification emails will also greet you by name, “Hi Marquisa” versus the impersonal “Hi” used in bogus emails.

  • Legitimate emails are a tad less presumptuous as to whether or not you’re actually out of the loop, reading “Here’s some activity you may have missed on Facebook” opposed to the fake notification flat-out stating, “Here’s some activity you have missed on Facebook.”

  • Links within real Facebook notices point to a page on the www.facebook.com domain, but spam emails typically link to third-party sites.  (Note: There are exceptions to this rule.)

  • Depending on your Facebook account settings there may be an additional line at the bottom of the email that reads something like this: “You are only receiving important updates and summary emails instead of individual notification emails. You can turn individual email notifications back on at any time.” Of course, this line may vary depending on your specific preferences, but you get the gist of it.


What to Do with Fake Facebook Emails


If you receive a fake Facebook email notification, it’s recommended that you:

  • Avoid clicking on any links.

  • Mark the email as ‘Spam’ in your email client.

  • Report the email to Facebook.

  • Delete the email immediately.


Don’t miss out on the latest tech news and computer security alerts! Follow us on Twitter at @hyphenet,  “Like” us on Facebook or add us to your circle on Google+

Friday, June 8, 2012

Scam Alert: No, Obama Is Not Going to Pay Your Utility Bills

Scam Bulb

The BBB is warning the public not to fall for a new scam that’s currently sweeping the nation and tricking folks into exposing their financial information by telling them that the President is ready to pay their utility bills under a new federal program.

The scam comes in many forms: email, text message, phone call, social media post – or is sometimes delivered straight from a scammer’s lips as they stand on your front doorstep dressed as a utility worker!

To “activate the program” and have your bills paid by President Obama, all you have to do is hand over your social security number and bank account information.

That sounds safe, right? (Not!)

Folks that make the mistake of disclosing their personal and financial information to the scammers will be given a fraudulent bank account number to use when they attempt to pay their bill. However, since the account doesn’t exist, no payment is ever applied and the full utility balance remains due.

Meanwhile, the crook has everything they need to steal the victim's identity and/or help themselves to the victim's bank account funds.

The scam has been reported in multiple states, prompting energy companies across the country to reach out and warn customers.  Victims are encouraged to notify police - along with their bank - if they suspect they’ve been hit by this scam.

Tips to Avoid Falling for this Scam


The BBB has offered the following advice to consumers:

  • Never provide your social security number, credit card number or banking information to anyone requesting it over the phone or at your home unless you initiated the contact and feel confident with whom you are speaking.

  • If you receive a call claiming to be your utility company and feel pressured for immediate payment or personal information, hang up the phone and call the customer service number on your utility bill.

  • Never allow anyone into your home to check electrical wiring, natural gas pipes or appliances unless you have scheduled an appointment or have reported a utility problem. Also, ask utility employees for proper identification.

  • Always think safety first. Do not give in to high pressure tactics over the phone for information or in person to get into your home.


Don’t miss out on the latest tech news and computer security alerts! Follow us on Twitter at @hyphenet,  “Like” us on Facebook or add us to your circle on Google+

Buy a CISCO Catalyst 2960 24P 10/100 LAN Switch for $419!

CISCO Catalyst 2960 24P 10/100 LAN SwitchCisco Catalyst 2960 Series Intelligent Ethernet Switches enable entry-level enterprise, medium-sized, and branch office networks to provide enhanced LAN services. This family of fixed-configuration, standalone devices provide desktop 10/100 Fast Ethernet and 10/100/1000 Gigabit Ethernet connectivity.

Until June 15th, 2012, you can order a CISCO Catalyst 2960 24P 10/100 LAN Switch from Hyphenet for only $419, plus shipping!

Specifications for CISCO Catalyst 2960 24P 10/100 LAN Switch









































MFR#WS-C2960-24-S
Enclosure TypeRack-mountable - 1U
Ports24 x 10/100
PerformanceSwitching capacity : 16 Gbps
Forwarding performance (64-byte packet size): 3.6 Mpps
MAC Address
Table Size
8K entries
Remote Management
Protocol
SNMP 1,
SNMP 2,
RMON 1,
RMON 2,
Telnet,
SNMP 3,
SNMP 2c,
HTTP,
HTTPS,
TFTP,
SSH-2
FeaturesLayer 2 switching,
auto-sensing per device,
DHCP support,
auto-negotiation,
VLAN support,
auto-uplink (auto MDI/MDI-X),
IGMP snooping,
Syslog support,
DiffServ support,
Broadcast Storm Control,
Multicast Storm Control,
Unicast Storm Control,
Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP) support,
Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) support,
Dynamic Trunking Protocol (DTP) support,
Port Aggregation Protocol (PAgP) support,
Quality of Service (QoS),
Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP),
Port Security,
MAC Address Notification
Compliant StandardsIEEE 802.3,
IEEE 802.3u,
IEEE 802.3z,
IEEE 802.1D,
IEEE 802.1Q,
IEEE 802.3ab,
IEEE 802.1p,
IEEE 802.3x,
IEEE 802.3ad (LACP),
IEEE 802.1w,
IEEE 802.1x,
IEEE 802.1s,
IEEE 802.3ah,
IEEE 802.1ab (LLDP)
WarrantyLimited lifetime warranty

Don't miss out on this Buy of the Week! Call (619) 325-0990 to order your CISCO Catalyst 2960 24P 10/100 LAN Switch today!


Buy of the Week offer valid through June 15th, 2012.

* Shipping and taxes apply.

Thursday, June 7, 2012

Do You Use LinkedIn, eHarmony or Last.fm? Change Your Passwords NOW!

Passwords Stolen from LinkedIn, eHarmony & Last.fmIt would be wise to take a moment to change the passwords to your LinkedIn, eHarmony and Last.fm accounts as soon as possible.

All three sites suffered a data breach this week, resulting in millions of user passwords being stolen and posted to underground hacker forums as the attackers sought help in cracking them.

6+ Million Passwords Lifted from LinkedIn


The series of break-ins started Wednesday morning with LinkedIn, who took to their blog and Twitter account to confirm the breach and advise that affected users would be notified via email to change their passwords.

Various media outlets reported that a Russian hacker had decrypted a portion of the stolen passwords and posted over 6 million SHA-1 hashes that they were unable to decode on forums dedicated to password cracking.

Around 1.5 Passwords Taken in eHarmony Breach


Adding to the drama, online dating website eHarmony posted on their blog Wednesday night, stating that they had also suffered a breach and would also be sending notices advising users to update their passwords.

Ars Technica reports that the unsalted MD5 hashes of 1.5 million eHarmony passwords were also uploaded to sites focused on cracking passwords. It is important to note that the attackers could have more passwords in their possession and only posted the ones they need help decrypting.

Last.fm Looking Into Password Leaks


On Thursday morning, Last.fm announced that they too were investigating a possible breach and urged users to change their passwords immediately as a precaution.

They have not disclosed how many passwords are believed to have been leaked and will be posting updates on their Twitter account and site forums.

Do You Use These Sites? Update Your Passwords NOW!


I you use LinkedIn, eHarmony or Last.fm, make sure you change your passwords immediately and use a unique password for every website.

If you use the same password on other websites outside of LinkedIn, eHarmony or Last.fm, it’s also strongly recommended that you change your passwords on those sites as well.

Don’t miss out on the latest tech news and computer security alerts! Follow us on Twitter at @hyphenet,  “Like” us on Facebook or add us to your circle on Google+

Tuesday, June 5, 2012

More YouTube Spam to Avoid: You Have Unread Messages or a Full Inbox

YouTube LogoThe cybercriminals behind the YouTube pharmacy spam campaign are quite the busy bunch.

For the last few months, they’ve been firing off hoards of fake YouTube notification emails that link to a variety of illegal pharmaceutical websites.

In order to yield the best click-through rates, the spammers took the time to make the spam messages appear as though they were coming from the popular video streaming site – with spoofed headers and all.

Here’s the latest batch of bogus YouTube emails for you to avoid:

YouTube Inbox is full Spam



From: YouTube Service (service@youtube.com)
Subject: Warning: Your inbox is full, message not accepted

YouTube              help center | e-mail options | report spam

Warning:
Your inbox is full, message not accepted
http://www.youtube.com/inbox?feature=mhsn

You can reply to this message by visiting your inbox.

© 2011 YouTube, LLC

901 Cherry Ave, San Bruno, CA 94066

 YouTube 2 personal message spam



From: YouTube Service (service@youtube.com)
Subject: You have 2 unread personal message

YouTube              help center | e-mail options | report spam

You have 2 unread personal message
http://www.youtube.com/inbox?feature=mhsn

You can reply to this message by visiting your inbox.
© 2011 YouTube, LLC
901 Cherry Ave, San Bruno, CA 94066

Despite the anchor text, all of the links within the emails above point to a pharmaceutical website.

Dealing with YouTube Pharmacy Spam


Did you get one of the emails above (or one of the many variants)?

  • Avoid clicking on any links inside the email.

  • Mark the email as “Spam” or “Junk” in your email client.

  • Report the email to SpamCop. (There does not appear to be a way to report the email to YouTube/Google.)

  • Delete the email immediately.


Don’t miss out on the latest tech news and computer security alerts! Follow us on Twitter at @hyphenet,  “Like” us on Facebook or add us to your circle on Google+

Windows Updates Failing to Install? Try Using Windows Troubleshooter

Windows Update, Y U NO INSTALL UPDATES?!Recently my home computer running Windows 7 experienced difficulties applying a set of updates, which I wasn’t too thrilled about for a variety of reasons:

  1. I was constantly being reminded (by my antivirus software, ESET) that my operating system was out of date.  Yes, thank you, I’m aware.

  2. Working for an IT company, I understand the importance of keeping your computer operating system fully patched. The last thing I want is my system to become infected with malware thanks to a vulnerability that would’ve been addressed had Windows Update worked properly.

  3. I prefer seeing the green shield icon and message saying there are “no important updates available” versus the red shield saying the updates were not installed.


Searching for a resolution for the Windows Update error code I was getting was no help. Attempting to install the updates one by one didn’t make a difference either, and if anything, the individual attempts lead to more confusion by throwing another error message into the mix: “The expected version of the product was not found on your system.”

At that point I was just annoyed – why was I being prompted to install these updates if they weren’t for software I had on my system? (It was for Microsoft Office 2007, by the way.)

After browsing through a few Microsoft Support threads related to Windows Update issues, I (finally) came across a potential fix for my problem.

Windows Update Troubleshooter to the Rescue!


In the event that you run into a similar situation and Windows Update fails to install any updates from Microsoft, I suggest giving the following a shot:

  • Click 'Start'

  • Type in ‘Troubleshooting’ and click Enter. (FYI: The option is in the Control Panel -> Under Systems and Security, click ‘Find and fix problems’)

  • Click ‘Fix problems with Windows Update’

  • Click ‘Next’ and let the troubleshooter do its thing.


After all is said & done with the troubleshooter, try running Windows Update again. That did the trick for me and now my system is fully patched and up-to-date!

Did it work for you too?

Don’t miss out on the latest tech news and computer security alerts! Follow us on Twitter at @hyphenet,  “Like” us on Facebook or add us to your circle on Google+

Friday, June 1, 2012

Refer a Business to Hyphenet & Get a Dyson DC25!

Dyson DC25You know what’s awesome? Referrals.

You know what’s even MORE awesome? Getting cool rewards in exchange for referring a new customer to a business.

Since we’re a fan of things that are awesome here at Hyphenet, we’ve decided to give a Dyson DC25 Vacuum ($499 value) to anyone that refers a business to us that signs up for one of our monthly IT services.

There’s no limit on the number of referrals you can send either – we’ll give you a new Dyson DC25 for every qualifying referral. So if you were looking for an easy (and inexpensive) way to build an army of Dyson DC25’s, here’s your chance.

So, what are you waiting for? Refer a Business Today!


Here’s how you can send us a referral:

  • Send an email to sales@hyphenet with the referral information (name, company, phone number, email address and the like).

  • Complete our online referral form.

  • Give us a call at (619) 325-0990.


Psst.. help us get the word out by downloading and sharing our [download id="5" format="Plain Text"]. :)

Buy of the Week: Lenovo ThinkCentre Edge 71 1577 Desktop for $380!

This offer expired on 6/8/12. Please check the banner ad at the top of the page for active deals.

Lenovo ThinkCentre Edge 71 1577The ThinkCentre Edge 71 desktop computers are specifically designed for the mainstream small and medium businesses. Now you can increase productivity and performance with a pint-sized budget and big savings.

Until June 8th, 2012, you can order a Lenovo ThinkCentre Edge 71 1577 Desktop from Hyphenet for only $380, plus shipping!

Specifications for Lenovo ThinkCentre Edge 71 1577 Desktop

















































MFR#1577J7U
ProcessorIntel Celeron G530 / 2.4 GHz ( Dual-Core )
RAM2 GB DDR3 SDRAM - 1066 MHz
Hard Drive320 GB HDD
Optical StorageDVD-Writer
GraphicsIntel HD Graphics Dynamic
Video Memory Technology 5.0
Audio OutputSound card - stereo
NetworkingNetwork adapter -
Ethernet,
Fast Ethernet,
Gigabit Ethernet
Operating SystemMicrosoft Windows 7 Pro (64-bit)
DisplayNone
Warranty1 year warranty on-site (Lenovo)

Don't miss out on this Buy of the Week! Call (619) 325-0990 to order your Lenovo ThinkCentre Edge 71 1577 Desktop today!


Buy of the Week offer valid through June 8th, 2012.

* Shipping and taxes apply.
This offer expired on 6/8/12. Please check the banner ad at the top of the page for active deals.